A One-to-Two-State Solution

Posted by , 29th September 2010

PalestineRobert Wright
9/29/2010

Wright says the route to peace in the Middle East may be pursuing a one-state solution, which could lead to a two-state solution. Palestine could force peace by giving up on violence as a tool of persuasion, giving up on the current round of negotiations, and holding demonstrations in which people ask for only the right to vote, stating that if they live under Israeli rule, and Israel is a democracy, they should be part of it. Such a peaceful approach would gain international support and would force Israel’s hand. Leaving the problem unresolved is only keeping Israel on the path to catastrophe.

Wright is a New York Times columnist.

Link to full text in primary source.

Give your opinion

In Turkey, a Red-Blue Divide

Posted by , 20th September 2010

ErdoganAsli Aydintasbas
9/17/2010

Aydintasbas says Turkey needs a new definition of citizenship that does not exclude the Kurds, a new electoral law that breaks the hegemony of party leaders and lowers the 10% threshold for a party to be represented in parliament, and a new commitment to freedom of speech. These remain the glaring deficits in today’s Turkish democracy. Secular Turks can try to retain the status quo, but that will not win elections. Erdogan, Turkey’s strongman, with a mixed record of reform and repression, also needs to do some thinking. He is a divisive figure, loved and hated passionately at the same time. He won the vote on constitutional reform on Sunday, but in a country so polarized the majority will not translate into easy legitimacy.

Aydintasbas is a columnist at the Turkish daily Milliyet.

Link to full text in primary source.

Give your opinion

Peace Talks? What’s on TV?

Posted by , 15th September 2010

Israel y PalestinaRoger Cohen
9/14/2010

Cohen reports from Israel, where he says little attention is focused on the peace talks with Palestine. People prefer to watch the Israeli version of American Idol on television. People do not trust politics, they don’t trust peace, and the recent arrivals from the former Soviet Union don’t have democratic values, which has weakened democracy there, according to Israeli historian Tom Segev, whom Cohen interviews. He says people are “busy privatizing themselves in online worlds where national politics matter little” and have become cynical and blasé, which has eradicated idealism.

Cohen is a New York Times columnist.

Link to full text in primary source.

Give your opinion

As Ugly as It Gets

Posted by , 27th May 2010
Ahmadinejad with president of Brazil Luiz Inác...

Image via Wikipedia

Thomas L. Friedman
5/26/2010

Friedman says it is wrong for Brazil and Turkey–democracies who have overcome military rule in their past–to embrace Iran because Iran crushes democratic freedom. The nuclear deal these countries struck with Iran weakens the global coalition to pressure Iran to open its facilities to UN inspectors and legitimizes Ahmadinejad on the one-year anniversary of crushing the Iranian democracy movement that had demanded a recount of Iran’s tainted elections.

Friedman is a New York Times columnist
.

Link to full text in primary source.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Give your opinion

A flawed strategy and a failed war in Afghanistan

Posted by , 27th May 2010
Minneapolis demonstration against the escalati...

Image by Fibonacci Blue via Flickr

Katrina vanden Heuvel
5/26/2010

The author makes a case against the war in Afghanistan, calling President Obama’s approach “fundamentally flawed” and far too costly in lives and money. The numbers from last month’s Pentagon report indicate that the counterinsurgency, intended to win over the Afghan people, has not been successful. Vanden Heuvel supports an alternative strategy of gradual troop withdrawal and diplomacy, but the president has asked for $32 billion for the troop surge in Afghanistan. As the Senate votes on this bill next week, perhaps it will demonstrate the growing opposition in Congress and among American citizens to “a flawed strategy and a failed war.”

Katrina vanden Heuvel is editor and publisher of The Nation and writes a weekly column for The Post
.

Link to full text in primary source
.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Give your opinion

The End of Nuclear Diplomacy

Posted by , 18th May 2010
Coat of arms of the Islamic Republic of Iran. ...
Image via Wikipedia

Bret Stephens
5/18/2010

The nuclear game Tehran is playing isn’t any more complicated than checkers. But the trouble is they’re whipping us at it. The agreement of Turkey and Brazil to enrich Iran’s uranium is a signal defeat for the Obama administration. Iran’s leaders have learned to habituate the international community to its nuclear advances. What was once considered intolerable Iranian behavior–calling for Israel to be wiped off the map, enriching uranium in defiance of UN resolutions, even becoming a nuclear power–is increasingly seen as unremarkable or understandable or inevitable. The US will now be hard-pressed to explain why a deal they never withdrew from the table–and which they insisted remain unaltered–no longer makes sense.


Stephens writes ‘Global View’ for the Journa
l.

Link to full text in primary source.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Give your opinion

Egypt’s Persecuted Christians

Posted by , 18th May 2010
The Hanging Church of Cairo, first built in th...
Image via Wikipedia

Moheb Zaki
5/18/2010

Violence against Copts is on the rise and all but ignored by the state. Despite the suffering of the Copts, the Egyptian government insists that there is no sectarian problem and brands as traitors those who draw international attention to the Copts’ plight. So far the US and the rest of the Western democracies, despite repeated Coptic appeals, have done little besides calling upon the Egyptian regime to foster greater tolerance. The “dhimmi” status of the Copts will not be changed by sweet persuasion. It will only change by persistent domestic struggle supported by international pressure. The Copts do not demand the tolerance of Muslims but rather equal rights with them.

Zaki is a former managing director of the Ibn Khaldun Center, a nonprofit organization that supports democracy and civil rights in Egypt and the Middle East.

Link to full text in primary source.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Give your opinion

A Beer for Palestine

Posted by , 18th May 2010
West Bank
Image via Wikipedia

Roger Cohen
5/18/2010

Cohen looks at the struggles over the past 15 years of a microbrewery established in the West Bank. Today the company is on the rebound and business is good due to the political situation. Cohen says the business is a barometer of the stronger economy and the institutions of statehood being built by Prime Minister Salam Fayyad. If the six percent economic growth is to continue, the West Bank must wean itself off international aid and become self-sustaining, and logistics and infrastructure must improve, along with peace. Cohen says, “Israel won’t do better than Fayyad.”

Cohen is a New York Times columnist.

Link to full text in primary source.

Reblog this post [with Zemanta]

Give your opinion

Pakistan and Times Sq.

Posted by , 13th May 2010

Nicholas D. Kristof
5/13/2010

times squareKristof says one way to fight terrorism at home is to invest in schools abroad. He says the reason so many terrorists are coming from Pakistan, a US ally, could be that in the 1970s and 1980s Pakistan’s leader used religious fundamentalism to buttress his regime while ignoring education. In contrast, Kristof looks at neighboring Bangladesh, which Henry Kissinger called an international basket case and now, thanks to education, has bolstered its economy, reduced population growth, encouraged growth of a civil society, and dampened fundamentalism. Encouraging education and dropping tariffs on imports from Pakistan could do the same for Pakistan.

Kristof is a New York Times columnist.

Link to full text in primary source.

Give your opinion